10 July 2013

Review: Anatomy of a Single Girl by Daria Snadowsky

Anatomy of a Single Girl (Anatomy #2) by Daria Snadowsky

Published: 8 January 2013 by Delacorte

Pages: 227 (hardcover)

Genre/s: New Adult, Contemporary

Source: Author for review

As the second book in the series, this review may have spoilers for Anatomy of a Boyfriend

Synopsis

After everything that happened—my first boyfriend, my first time, my first breakup—jumping back into the dating game seemed like the least healthy thing I could do. It’s not that I didn’t want to fall in love again, since that’s about the best feeling ever. But as a busy college premed still raw from heartbreak, which is the worst feeling ever, I figured I’d lie low for a while. Of course, as soon as I stopped looking for someone, an impossibly amazing—and devastatingly cute—guy came along, and I learned that having a new boyfriend is the quickest way to recover from losing your old one. 

The moment we got together, all my preconceptions about romance and sex were turned upside down. I discovered physical and emotional firsts I never knew existed. I learned to let go of my past by living in the present. It was thrilling. It was hot. It was just what the doctor ordered.

But I couldn’t avoid my future forever. 

My Thoughts

As soon as I finished the first book in the Anatomy series (Anatomy of a Boyfriend), I went straight on to Anatomy of a Single Girl because I was really enjoying the honesty, humour and spectacular awkwardness of the main character, Dom.  As well as the relationship and sex perspective of the first book, I wanted to see just what would happen next as Dom entered college.

Starting not long after the end of Anatomy of a Boyfriend, you could probably read this novel as a standalone, but I'm going to recommend reading it after Boyfriend because it's great to see the way that Dom grows as a character from the lovesick teenager to a confident, happy woman.

What I liked about Dom in the first book, and even more after finishing Single Girl was that she was so certain about some parts of her life, while still being insecure about others.  It's pretty unusual to find someone who is completely confident in every aspect of their lives, so it made her much more relatable and down-to-earth.

The romance side in Single Girl is very different from Boyfriend - it feels much more mature and realistic and there's a much more magnetic attraction than Dom had with Wes.   All of this reflects how much Dom grows over the course of the books, and in particular over the course of Single Girl. 

There's a greater focus on the more positive sides of sexual relationships, and even more so than in Boyfriend, Ms. Snadowsky really gets down to the nitty gritty and covers more than the intimacy of sex, branching out into sexual health - something I haven't come across often in YA/NA novels.

This is a great series - as I said in my review of Boyfriend, I really wish I'd read these books when I was a teenager - they are incredibly honest and open, the characters are fun and likable, and covers the whole spectrum of growing up - friendships, relationships, sexual experiences, parental relationships and personal growth.

3 comments:

  1. That sounds so great!! I should really read these. I especially like how the book seems to deal with sex - as I found it often simply glossed over in YA

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  2. I had read a few negative reviews for this series and was going to give it a pass but now you've got me interested again. They sound a little different (and real) from the other YA/NA books out there.


    Karen @ For What It's Worth

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  3. Though I preferred Boyfriend to Single Girl (purely based on personal experiences alone), I do love how Snadowsky was able to keep the relevancy and authenticity in this sequel. Her characters are relatable and the situations realistic. She focuses on growth, positivity and safe sex (which is so often overlooked) and those are things I really appreciated. Also, I found Guy to be a much more likeable dude than Wes!

    Like you, I wish I had read these books as a teen/young adult although it is quite interesting reflecting back as an adult.

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